Organic

143 Chiefs Want Victory Gardens

Above: Group Village Headman of Kazitenge Village —
Addressing Crowd at The Face-to-Face Project Victory Garden Event

Kazitenge Village Chiefs Dancing at F2F Event

Overlooked by government and large charities, tribal chiefs are traditional leaders in the everyday lives of villagers. Chiefs command respect and support, and that’s why The Face-to-Face Project works closely with them.
 
In the past 2 weeks, 143 chiefs came to The Face-to-Face Project victory garden events. They all know The Face-to-Face Project doesn’t provide handouts or material goods, and they understand that we require them to create victory gardens at their own homes.
 
The head chief of Kazitenge village, in a red coat above, celebrates with fellow chiefs because most of his residents have victory gardens. He tells other chiefs that his people are growing their own food, without spending money. He explains that villagers are healthier, children go to school, and crime has gone down.
 
Chief Kazitenge urges other chiefs to follow his lead. In 5 districts in Malawi, that’s exactly what chiefs are doing.
 
Demand for victory gardens is sky high. And The Face-to-Face Project believes the sky’s the limit.

Honor Your Roots, Eat Your Vegetables

Above: Traditional Tchope Dance & Victory Garden Vegetables
at The Face-to-Face Project’s Mtambalika Event in Phalombe

Malawians believe that maize = Africa = life. 
 
But maize came from the Americas and doesn’t grow well in Malawi’s dry climate. That’s why The Face-to-Face Project’svictory gardens promote faster, more easily grown leafy greens and grains that are indigenous to Malawi. 
 
These plants like Malawi’s climate, and they’re high in nutrition. Plus, they taste great too!
 
Because many villagers have forgotten how to eat these plants, we re-introduce them in events that feature traditional dust-raising, crowd-thrilling dancing.  
 
Honor your heritage, stomp your feet, and eat your vegetables. 

Emily Creates 355 Gardens

Face-to-Face Project Garden Facilitator, Emily Kayama, poses alongside husband and wife, Jessie and Shadreck Chindiwo, in their garden in Phunduma village, Malawi.

Emily Kayama, above wearing black, is one of 30 villagers who first learned about victory gardens in November 2017. Emily loved the idea of growing vegetables at no cost next to the home so much, that she asked to be a garden facilitator to help her fellow villagers.  

Emily and 3 other team members have created a whopping 355 gardens in just 8 months, including helping Jessie and Shadreck Chindiwo, pictured here, create their garden. The couple now harvests over 10 vegetable varieties, giving the family good, nutritious food, and saving them from buying food at the market.

Growing Stronger With Victory Gardens

We are so excited to announce that since we launched The Victory Garden Campaign in July of 2016 in Malawi, 15,000 gardens have been created, reaching 1,089 villages, and helping 45,000 families.

Big thanks to all of our amazing supporters. Because of your generosity the Campaign has had a real impact, helping people not only grow enough food to eat, but also earn an income, improve nutrition, lead healthy lives, and become self-reliant. Thanks for being our Champions of Change!

We Know How To Fight Hunger!

Mary Bitoni, above, just after creating her victory garden on November 9, 2017

Last November, Mary Bitoni created an organic victory garden next to her house. Returning to Malawi this week, I met Mary again — actually she ran for us to make sure we saw her garden.

Just two months after she broke earth, her lush garden provides food every day. She didn’t spend a penny and she now harvests over 7 kinds of vegetables.

In Mary’s community, The Face-to-Face Project has created over 700 victory gardens since November 2017.

We know how to fight hunger.

And Mary’s tremendous smile keeps us moving forward.

Mary on January 17, 2018 in her lush new garden